Tag Archives: acceptance

“We always have the choice”

Having experienced xenophobia and intolerance ourselves does not give us the right to be xenophobic and intolerant towards someone else. We need to learn from our negative experiences to create as much positivity in the world as possible.

“We can let the circumstances of our lives harden us so that we become increasingly resentful and afraid, or we can let them soften us, and make us kinder. We always have the choice. “

– Dalai Lama

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Although I am new to the blogging world and am completely incompetent at using technology (I only recently learned how to make hyperlinks), I believe that my message of peace and tolerance needs to be heard. To learn a little bit more about my background please read my post titled “A little bit about myself…”. To learn more about why I started this blog, please read my post titled“Introduction…”.

Is atheism a religion?

Sometimes in criticising that which we believe to be closed-minded, we become just as closed-minded as those we aim to criticise. For example, non-religious people can be very critical of the devoutly religious, but in their criticisms, they become just as closed-minded as the people they seek to criticise. It is important not to become closed-minded in seeking open-mindedness. In attempting to discredit something for being ignorant, intolerant and dogmatic; it is important not to become ignorant, intolerant and dogmatic ourselves.

Atheism can be just as dogmatic and impenetrable as theism. Believing that God exists or believing that God doesn’t exist can still be narrowed down to believing. Sometimes believing in something makes us so focused on our specific belief that we fail to take anything else into account, including the lack of logic in our own beliefs (I think the same can be said for knowledge). In the words of JP Sears*- “Rebel against dogmatic religious terminology by dogmatically using spiritual terminology…You don’t see that you are actually still subscribed to the exact same belief system, you’re rebelling against; because now you are expressing the same concepts just with new words.”

Theists believe in God and seek to prove that God exists, and atheists (who do not believe in God) seek to prove that God does not exists…both are trying to prove something- and this proof usually comes in the form of intolerance towards anyone who has an opposing belief. This intolerance usually manifests itself through venomous phrases such as- “Religion is the root cause of all the violence in the word” and “Genocides have been committed by atheist, like Mao, Pol-Pot and Stalin”

What makes atheism or religion either violent or peaceful are the individual people who subscribe to either atheism or religion. We cannot afford to make blanket statements like “all religious people promote violence” or “all atheists are immoral” because these stereotypes are simply not true. Both atheists and theists (hopefully) want to build a peaceful world without wars and violence, they just want to go about it in different ways- without God and with God. In putting each other down, we take steps further and further back from our goal of building a more harmonious and peaceful world.

For me personally, whether atheism is perceived as a religion or not is irrelevant. Forcing people to adhere to your ways, whether you are an atheist or a theist is wrong (For more on this point, please read my blog post titled “Do you prefer tea or coffee?” ) What matters most is finding a way for everyone to respect, appreciate, accept, understand and finally coexist with one another.

http://steve.rogueleaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/140308-Tit-For-Tat-Atheism-Religion.png
http://steve.rogueleaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/140308-Tit-For-Tat-Atheism-Religion.png

* Check out the video “How to be Ultra Spiritual (funny) with JP Sears- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kDso5ElFRg 

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Although I am new to the blogging world and am completely incompetent at using technology (I only recently learned how to make hyperlinks), I believe that my message of peace and tolerance needs to be heard. To learn a little bit more about my background please read my post titled “A little bit about myself…”. To learn more about why I started this blog, please read my post titled“Introduction…”.

Do you prefer tea or coffee?

This post has been inspired by the following image that has been shared on Facebook-

subway bunnings

(*Subway is an American fast-food restaurant franchise that sells sandwiches; and Bunnings is an Australian hardware and household chain)

Whenever I have discussions with people about sexual preferences and religion, I usually always refer to the following analogy-

You like tea, and the person next to you likes coffee. If you convince the person next to you to drink tea, will your tea-drinking experience be somehow enhanced? Will it make your tea taste better? Likewise, if the person next you convinced you to drink coffee instead of tea, would their coffee now taste better as a result? Given that the obvious answer is “no”… converting a tea-drinking person to coffee of a coffee-drinking person to tea, will do nothing more than make a tea-drinker adhere to a coffee-drinker’s personal choice, or make a coffee-drinker adhere to a tea-drinker’s choice. A person, who freely elects to drink tea or coffee, should understand that others are just as free to make the same decision. There is a reason why both tea and coffee exist.

“Tea” and “coffee” can be substituted for “heterosexual” and “homosexual”, or “religious” and “not religious”, “vegetarian” and “not vegetarian” etc. I really cannot understand how people feel entitled to get “offended” by someone else’s decisions to prefer “tea” over “coffee” or vice versa. If you feel entitled to make a “choice” between “tea” and “coffee”, the person next to you is just as entitled to make the same “choice”. Their choice should not offend you, and your choice should not offend them.

As long as we have mutual understanding, mutual acceptance and a mutual desire towards peace and coexistence, it really doesn’t matter who drinks tea and who drinks coffee.

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Although I am new to the blogging world and am completely incompetent at using technology (I only recently learned how to make hyperlinks), I believe that my message of peace and tolerance needs to be heard. To learn a little bit more about my background please read my post titled “A little bit about myself…”. To learn more about why I started this blog, please read my post titled“Introduction…”.

Tolerance and precision of language

Google has provided us with the following definition of tolerance:

Tolerance- ‘the ability or willingness to tolerate something, in particular the existence of opinions or behaviour that one does not necessarily agree with’.

A close friend of mine recently told me that he doesn’t like the word “tolerance”. He believes that to “tolerate” something, implies that there is something fundamentally wrong with whatever it is that we are tolerating. He told me that he would prefer for me to use words such as “understanding” and “respect” in my blog posts.

To be fair, it’s something that I have thought about but didn’t attach too much weight to…that is until I looked at Google’s example of using the word “tolerance” in a sentence- “the tolerance of corruption”. Corruption is something that is fundamentally and inherently wrong, but it is something that can be tolerated to some extent. I thought about the contexts in which I use the word “tolerate” myself. It’s not uncommon for me to say something like “I don’t like [xyz], but I can tolerate it in small doses”.

It’s kind of like when someone asks how you are and you respond with “fine” instead of “good”. The two words are basically synonymous, yet in practice their meaning can differ greatly. Perhaps “tolerance” is to “fine”, as what “acceptance, respect, and understanding “is to ”good”.

Having thought about it, I am not sure if I like the word “tolerance” either if it is being interpreted in such a way. There is nothing fundamentally wrong with interfaith, inter-race, multiculturalism, homosexuality, gender equality and whatever else I talk about in my blog posts. The themes I discuss are not something to dislike yet tolerate, but rather something to embrace, accept and celebrate.

The reason why I started this blog post in the first place was for people to concentrate on what they share in common with others, not to pick at differences. It’s not enough for people to “tolerate” one another, I want people to accept, understand, respect and celebrate one another.

❤ ❤ ❤

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Although I am new to the blogging world and am completely incompetent at using technology (I only recently learned how to make hyperlinks), I believe that my message of peace and tolerance needs to be heard. To learn a little bit more about my background please read my post titled “A little bit about myself…”. To learn more about why I started this blog, please read my post titled“Introduction…”.

Bikinis, niqabs, oppression and assumptions.

assumptions

Image:  https://www.pinterest.com/pin/547539267167376074/

I recently had a conversation on a Facebook thread with a close friend of mine after I had shared an article with the following feature image:

WaterWorld-Stoke-on-Trent-waterpark-burqa-Muslim-584338

(The article can be found on http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/584338/WaterWorld-Stoke-on-Trent-Muslim-Islam-waterpark-women-only-bikini-ban-clothing-veil-burqa, but this post relates to the feature image, rather than the content of the article itself)

My close friend (who is a Muslim female) had left a comment stating that she found the image to be an ‘interesting’ depiction of what is ‘Islamically appropriate’. I followed on by saying that a niqab (a form of veil that covers everything other than the eyes, as depicted in the above image) is not the only form of female attire that is considered ‘Islamically appropriate’. My close friend followed on to say that what she meant by her initial comment was that the opposite of ‘Islamically appropriate’ doesn’t necessarily mean bikini.

My close friend went on to say that a lot of non-Muslims associate Islam with a niqab and opression in the same way that a lot of Muslims from Islamic countries associate non-Muslims with open relationships, provocative attire and prostitution. Obviously these sorts of stereotypes are intolerant and incorrect. Islam doesn’t equate to niqab and not-Islam doesn’t equate to open relationships and provocative attire. To quote my close friend- “I think we need more knowledge and less assumptions” I couldn’t agree more and I couldn’t have said it any better myself. Islam is much more than a niqab and non-Islam is much more than a bikini.

As I have already mentioned in my post titled “Does he drink alcohol? Does he eat pork?” religion can be followed to various degrees and there is no single unanimous expression of a particular religion. The same goes for culture, national identity and much more.

In my previous post, I suggested that the best way to combat intolerance is through education, positive reinforcement and love. Likewise the best way to fight assumptions is though actual knowledge, not further assumptions that only lead to more and more intolerance.

Below, is another image that highlights the unfortunate nature of assumptions, which also suits the given theme of bikinis, niqabs and oppression.

opression Image: Cartoonist Malcolm Evans

 Unless the woman on the right lives in a country that makes any other form of attire other than a niqab illegal, both women are exercising their free will (if there is such a thing) to dress how they wish; and both women are making assumptions about one another. The woman on the left probably doesn’t think she is oppressed and the woman on the right probably doesn’t think she is oppressed either; yet oppression is the exact conclusion they have each reached about one another’s choice of attire.

“Your assumptions are your windows on the world. Scrub them off every once in a while, or the light won’t come in.”- Isaac Asimov

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Although I am new to the blogging world and am completely incompetent at using technology (I only recently learned how to make hyperlinks), I believe that my message of peace and tolerance needs to be heard. To learn a little bit more about my background please read my post titled “A little bit about myself…”. To learn more about why I started this blog, please read my post titled “Introduction…”.

“But (s)/he started it…”

Image- http://icanhas.cheezburger.com/

We are all capable of spotting someone else’s intolerance, but we’re not all that quick to spot our own. It’s particularly hard to stop ourselves from being intolerant towards someone who we perceive to be intolerant towards ourselves. However, we are not five year olds and the -“ but (s)/he started it” excuse isn’t going to cut it. Even in the face of intolerance, as hard as it may be, it’s probably best not to answer with intolerance. I’ve had to learn that the hard way (See my blog post titled “Tolerance Limits”).

Being hotheaded, self-righteous, stubborn and opinionated I have a tendency to accept almost every invitation to engage in a fight comprised solely of intolerance. I need to learn to choose my battles a bit more wisely and utilize my character traits for good, not evil. Like a five year old, I use the- “but (s)/he started it” excuse…and it’s simply not good enough. Even though I may not have been the one to start it, I chose to participate in it and that is just as bad.

If some kind of intolerant bigot (for the purpose of this example lets make them Australian) tells an immigrant to row their boat back to where they came from, can the immigrant accuse the bigot of having ancestors that were convicts or perpetrators of genocide? While it’s tempting (oh so tempting), it’s probably not correct and in the long run will create more problems that what it will solve. Intolerance needs to be dealt with in the right way, not the easy way. It’s like fighting racism with reverse racism, or sexism with reverse sexism…racism is racism and sexism is sexism. Irrespective of who the perpetrator and victim are, and whether or not their roles get reversed, it’s still intolerant and wrong.

When my husband was asked if he had any jihadi friends he didn’t lose it. When he was told that terrorists are Muslims that kill people just moments after, he still managed to keep his cool (For further details, refer to my blog post titled “Do you have any Jihadi friends?”). He didn’t rip apart his interlocutor with similar intolerant comments (like I probably would have) because he didn’t feel the need to stoop down to such a primitive level. If we defend ourselves in the same manner that we are being attacked, how are we any better than our attacker? If we know better, we need to act better.

If we want to dismantle intolerance and reinforce acceptance, it’s necessary for us to adhere to our own expectations. The right way to dismantle intolerance is through education, positive reinforcement and love. Fighting fire with fire in this sense will only reinforce intolerance further rather than dismantle it. As hard as it may be, when faced with some sort of bigotry, maybe we need to follow the advice that adults give five-year olds- if you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all.

” An eye for an eye will leave the world blind.”- Gandhi

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Although I am new to the blogging world and am completely incompetent at using technology (I only recently learned how to make hyperlinks), I believe that my message of peace and tolerance needs to be heard. To learn a little bit more about my background please read my post titled “A little bit about myself…”. To learn more about why I started this blog, please read my post titled “Introduction…”.

Tolerance limits

Image: https://www.pinterest.com/explore/hookah-smoke/

I’ve harped on about the importance of tolerance and I have also confessed that I am a hypocrite, so please enjoy another one of my potentially hypocritical posts. 🙂 As per usual, I am going to start-off with a story.

When my husband was still my boyfriend, we went out on a double date with close friends, who are a married couple. We went to some sort of a Middle-Eastern Shi-Sha* establishment. It was a Turkish, Lebanese or an Afghani cafe…I cannot for the life of me remember.

Everything was going swimmingly. We took our seats, we were given menus, the time came to make our order… and that’s when things got interesting. The male waiter only asked for the orders of the males present at the table. When I said “I’d like a soy latte, please” – the waiter didn’t look at me, or take down my order. I was beside myself. My then-boyfriend had to order a coffee on my behalf and the husband of the couple we were with also had to make an order for his wife.

This was a first for me. I had never experienced anything like it before. Baffled, I was completely lost for words. I asked the present company what in the world had just happened. The couple we were with (who are of Middle-Eastern background) put forward to me that perhaps the waiter was just trying to be respectful. Oh I’m sorry; on what planet is it respectful to purposefully ignore someone’s existence?

The couple tried to explain to me that because I was with a man, the waiter was being respectful towards said man by not looking at me and pretending that I didn’t exist, which was also in turn being respectful towards me. Apparently, it was a cultural thing. I would like to say that I am not xenophobic, but this definitely hit my tolerance limit. In my mind, here I was sitting in a café in Australia experiencing some sort of blatant sexism that was being masqueraded as a “respect” and “culture” thing.

I’m not going to lie. The- “go back to whichever country you came from, waiter” thought entered my mind.  This wasn’t because I was being intolerant towards him or his culture, it’s because I believe he was being intolerant to me, and my culture and ignorant towards his surroundings.It was intolerant, it was wrong and I am sorry. As pointed out in the comment below, I can’t preach about the importance of tolerance if I myself don’t adhere to the standards that I am trying to set. In the words of Einstein, “No problem can be solved with the same level of consciousness that created it”, so it is futile to fight bigotry with bigotry.

Different societies have different standards and norms. While holding onto your own culture is important, it cannot come at the expense and degradation of the standards and norms of the society in which you reside. As far as I am concerned, if you work in hospitality as as a waiter/waitress in Australia, you are supposed to take orders from patrons of the establishment you work for, irrespective of what gender, nationality, culture etc. those patrons may be. It’s called customer-service…it’s not rocket science. Tolerance needs to work both ways…but it doesn’t mean that if it only works one way it shouldn’t work at all.

The limit to my tolerance is when I feel that it is one-sided. I do my best not to project my culture/(s) and religion/(s) onto others, is it too much for me to expect that others will do the same? In a perfect world, tolerance should know no limits. We all have work to do with regards to tolerance and acceptance. I will continue working on myself and do my best to accept and tolerate others, even if they do not (or do not know how to) accept and tolerate me…and I do expect others to work on themselves accordingly.

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*Shisha smoking – also called hookah, narghile, waterpipe, or hubble bubble smoking – is a way of smoking tobacco, sometimes mixed with fruit or molasses sugar, through a bowl and hose or tube. (as defined by: https://www.bhf.org.uk/heart-health/risk-factors/smoking/shisha)

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Although I am new to the blogging world and am completely incompetent at using technology (I only recently learned how to make hyperlinks), I believe that my message of peace and tolerance needs to be heard. To learn a little bit more about my background please read my post titled “A little bit about myself…”. To learn more about why I started this blog, please read my post titled “Introduction…”.

Having faith in interfaith

Image: http://lifehopeandtruth.com/change/faith/

Although my husband and I have different backgrounds in religion, culture, language and nationality, none of our arguments have ever related to any of those differences. That’s not to say we never fight – because we do, our fights just don’t ever get political.

We are one of very few couples who not only get along with but also adore each other’s parents. My husband’s parents are crazy about me and I’m fairly sure my parents love my husband more than they love me. Furthermore our respective sets of parents share a love for each other. The fact that they live in different countries doesn’t stop them from contacting each other on a regular basis. Additionally, my Mum calls my husband’s brother and sister her son and daughter (respectively), and they in turn call my Mum their Mum too. The sort of relations my husband’s family has with my family can only be seen in fairytales, and even then our ‘Happily every after’ is better than that of any fairytale.

I have several friends and acquaintances that share the same nationality and religion as their partner, but their families can’t seem to get along. That puts a great strain on the functioning of their relationship and prospective future of their partnership. My husband and I are truly blessed, that despite all our differences our families get along and they get along well.

I can’t imagine the difficulty of an interfaith marriage of which one or both sets of parents disapprove. Thus, the small hardships that my husband and I have faced (and are likely yet to face) from the outside world, cannot in any way be compared to the sorts of hardships other interfaith couples experience whose parents disapprove of their union. I can’t really comment on those hardships because, luckily, I myself have not had to endure them. What I can say, however, is that my husband’s family and my family have set a pretty damn good example of how things should be with regards to interfaith marriage and marriage in general. Other interfaith couples’ families should seriously take note and follow suit.

Parents want what is best for their children, but sometimes what parents think is best for their children, isn’t want the children think is best for themselves. Furthermore, parents who are scared about their child marrying into a different culture or religion because they might lose the culture and religion they were born into, have unfounded fears. You don’t lose your identity to your partner when you marry them, so why would you lose your culture and religion? Anything is possible; it’s simply a matter of choice. If the families of a couple comprising of one Russian-Orthodox Jew and one Iranian Muslim could unite despite their differences and figure it out, I’m sure other families can figure it out too.

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Although I am new to the blogging world and am completely incompetent at using technology (I only recently learned how to make hyperlinks), I believe that my message of peace and tolerance needs to be heard. To learn a little bit more about my background please read my post titled “A little bit about myself…”. To learn more about why I started this blog, please read my post titled “Introduction…”.

Warm Fuzzies

In no particular order, I’d like to share a few memories that make me really happy and hopefully in some way relate to multiculturalism:

1. The time my Iranian-Muslim in-laws danced a Hora (a traditional Jewish ring dance, to the music of Hava Nagila) at the wedding of my husband and I. It was awesome. It was such a natural and beautiful unification of two seemingly opposing cultures- not exactly something you see everyday.

2. The time my Muslim mother-in-law prepared a meal that was Kosher for my Israeli best friend. This was definitely a sight to see. My Israeli Bestie and I were explaining to my Muslim mother-in-law why Jews separate dairy products from meat products, the concept of  ‘not cooking a kid in its mother’s milk’. Having understood my Bestie’s dietary requirement, my mother-in-law used Halal-certified meat (Muslim dietary requirement) to whip up a traditional Iranian dish that adhered to Kosher requirements.

3. The time my Iranian husband became an integral member of the family amongst Israelis.

4. The time my Russian Orthodox Mum and my Muslim Mother-in-law discovered that they pray for the same things but with different formalities attached. Both first pray for world peace before praying for their own individual needs. Both acknowledge that as long as there is one unhappy person in the world, no one can truly be happy.

5.  The time my sister-in-law bought duty-free bottles of Vodka in Dubai for the wedding of my husband and I, whilst wearing a headscarf. This is gold… Wearing a headscarf my sister-in-law causally asked the duty free sales assistant for two 1.5 litre bottles of Grey Goose Vodka (3 litres of alcohol was the purchasing allowance per person). Given that it is against Islam to consume alcohol and my Sister-in-law’s headscarf gave away her Muslim faith,  I can only imagine the bedazzled look on the shop assistant’s face. “Are you sure?”- the confused shop assistant asked. “Yes, I am sure. Don’t worry it’s not for me, it’s for a wedding with Russians” – she replied. I wish I could have been there to film it.

6. The time I told my Russian-Orthodox Mum that I want to embrace more of my Jewish identity, so she bought be a Star of David pendant. It’s not uncommon for me to wear the Star of David pendant and a Cross on the same necklace. It gets more interesting when I go to Iran and wear all of the above plus a compulsory headscarf.

7. The time my Mother-in-law ran outside without her headscarf (in Australia), thinking that something bad had happened to my husband and I.  Our safety was more important to her than a religious requirement.

8. The time an unlikely company comprising of one Russian, one Iranian, one Israeli and two Lebanese, got together to play Monopoly one New Years Eve. The political incorrectness ran rampant. My favourite quote of the night had to be- “Of course the poor, pregnant Arab is the outcast of the society- left basically broke waiting to pass through Go to collect $200.00, while the wealthy Jew is building hotels on Kings Avenue”… In case you didn’t get it- we were trying to be funny, not intolerant. All 5 of us have experienced intolerance one way or another, so what better way to surpass it than by poking fun at the associated stereotypes of our nationalities and religions in the company of good friends.

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These individual memories bring a smile to my face and warm fuzzies to my Heart Chakra. To me, they playfully symbolise peace love and harmony. Hopefully we can have more moments like these in the world and in our lives. ❤

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Although I am new to the blogging world and am completely incompetent at using technology (I only recently learned how to make hyperlinks), I believe that my message of peace and tolerance needs to be heard. To learn a little bit more about my background please read my post titled “A little bit about myself…”. To learn more about why I started this blog, please read my post titled “Introduction…”.

Guilty as charged

Image: KEVIN CURTIS via Getty Images, as sourced by http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/01/28/tyler-beavis-arrested-attempted-rape_n_6564918.html

I am a hypocrite. I have probably already contradicted myself several times in the last 48 hours of making my first few posts. Here I am preaching about the importance of tolerance, when I myself am just as intolerant as the people who I have described in my previous posts.

These posts not only serve to convey an important message to the world, they also remind me to work on myself. I’m trying really hard to dismantle intolerance within myself, towards a lot of things and its both challenging and rewarding.  I’m now going to share a few stories that I am not particularly proud of. Frankly just thinking about the examples makes me feel ashamed of myself, but I hope that I have come a long way since then.

I was getting ready to hit the town for a night out with a few girlfriends. I decided to be a little risque and put on a really revealing top. I wasn’t quite sure if it was appropriate, not just for that particular occasion, but generally ever.  When my husband (then fiance or boyfriend- I don’t exactly remember) saw what I was wearing, he gave me an unimpressed look followed by the sarcastic comment-  “Could you be wearing any less clothing?”

Immediately I felt empowered to start my unnecessary feminist rant of “I can wear what I want”, “This makes me happy”, “Don’t tell me how to dress” etc. Then the following scary-scary thought popped into my mind. It wasn’t just a fleeting thought, it was something that I had attached weight to-

“He demands me to cover-up because he is Muslim”.

I don’t have anything to say for myself. The thought entered my mind and I considered it. It was detrimental to me, to him, to our relationship and probably to humanity in general. ANYONE, including myself could have told me that the article of clothing was revealing. Had that person been my Mum, or my friend, I wouldn’t have gone ahead and dragged their religion into the discussion I was having with myself in my head.

I didn’t need to verbally articulate the thought, just thinking it was enough for it to be written on my face anyway. My better half read it in my eyes and said: “Are you really giving into what society thinks I’m going to do to you? Do you really think I am trying to break you? That I am trying to project Islam onto you? How could you think that?”

I cried, and he comforted me. I should have been comforting him and apologising profusely, but instead he held me and told me that everything was going to be okay and assured me that I am not a horrible person.

I’d love to say that stupid these thoughts stopped entering my consciousness after that occasion, but that would be a lie. Similar thoughts popped into my head when my Hubby told me that he wasn’t comfortable with me taking pole-dancing classes and that he didn’t like me staying out late at night without his company. He didn’t tell me to go to a mosque, befriend Mullahs and pray 5 times a day. But I felt entitled to interpret his concerns about my reputation and safety in that way.

My husband never gave me the third degree for having these impure thoughts. He didn’t label me “intolerant”  or “racist” or “religionist”. He just simply accepted me and continues to accept me for who I am, as I am, with whatever thoughts that enter my mind. This makes me wonder why can’t I just simply do the same? Why can’t we all do the same? Simply accept people as they are without labelling and without trying to force them into a mould produced by stereotypes. I know from my own experience that it’s easier said than done, but it needs to be done.

Having been born in a different country to parents of contrasting religions and growing up with a different culture, doesn’t make me any more or less susceptible to intolerance. In this regard, I need to work on myself just as much as anyone else does. The way we interpret what others say to us depends a lot on our own perceptions and paradigms, not necessarily on what the other person is actually saying. Lets not be quick to jump to conclusions, especially those offered to us by stereotypes.

“Be the change you want to see in the world”

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Although I am new to the blogging world and am completely incompetent at using technology (I only recently learned how to make hyperlinks), I believe that my message of peace and tolerance needs to be heard. To learn a little bit more about my background please read my post titled “A little bit about myself…”. To learn more about why I started this blog, please read my post titled “Introduction…”.